High School Curriculum » Curriculum

Curriculum

Northland Christian School is committed to preparing all students for the world of tomorrow and offering each student directed academic planning, giving them the best opportunities for the future. In our continued pursuit of these goals, Northland continues to deliver “Excellence in Academics”.
 
“Excellence in Academics” is a culture. It is our strategic plan for immersing students in a culture of excellence – in a culture where achievement is valued and excellence is encouraged; or even better, where excellence is required. It is designed to move students to an understanding of their God-given gifts. We are intentional about our claim to be a college preparatory school. “Excellence in Academics” is our action plan to vault our graduates into their college choices, excited to embrace all that each university can offer them.
The Northland Secondary Bible Program is designed to teach the Bible with the goal of life transformation through faith in Jesus Christ and the power of the Holy Spirit. Through our curriculum and enrichment, students will learn Biblical truths and have the opportunity to experience the power of God’s word through community outreach, real world applications, and through an interactive and challenging classroom environment. Our Bible curriculum is intentionally designed to fulfill our mission that students grow spiritually, intellectually, physically, and socially for the glory of God.
 
9th Grade
New Testament Foundations - “Behold Your God”
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This study has one purpose—to encourage students to know the attributes and character of God. By presenting the Bible as God’s self-revelation, “Behold Your God” magnifies the character and work of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. As students know and love their incomprehensible God, they’ll discover a grace they can reflect to others as they learn how to live a life that is grounded and dependent on God’s love and truth.
 
10th Grade
Old Testament Survey and Understanding the Faith
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course will provide an in-depth, detailed study of the Old Testament with attention paid to the language, culture, literature, and overall context of this immense portion of Scripture. The goal of this class is to improve biblical literacy, to show continuity in God’s activity from creation on through Jesus and into the Church today, and to teach students how to read the Bible well and apply it in their lives.
 
11th Grade
Christ and Culture
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
The First Semester will be a comparative study of the 4 Gospels to empower students to understand the nature of scripture and character of Christ. The second semester will focus on Richard H. Niebuhr’s book Christ and Culture, which explores how Christians interpret and understand the culture that we live in as a foundation for their senior course work “Understanding the Culture.”
 
12th Grade
Understanding the Culture/Times
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
In a time when more than half of all Christian students walk away from their faith in college, no other curriculum is more urgently needed. This series transforms students’ learning and faith. During the first semester students will engage with “Understanding the Culture”, which outlines the key social issues of our time and shows students how to engage their biblical worldview and transform our post-Christian culture.
 
The second semester, students will study “Understanding the Times”, which surveys today’s major worldviews and teaches students how to identify and counter the negative ideology so many young adults have unwittingly adopted. Attention will be given to equip students to develop a biblically sound worldview based on the accurate Word of God, wherein all social, moral, economic, and political views, molded by Christian principles, will prepare them to know what they believe and why they believe, with an eye towards sharing those beliefs with others.
Communication Applications 8th - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Communication Applications is designed to teach the skills and strategies needed to become an effective communicator in a variety of “real life” situations. Students will build self-confidence while speaking in both formal and informal settings. Students are expected to identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in interpersonal situations, interviews, group interactions, and professional or personal presentations. Assignments will focus on verbal and nonverbal messages, listening skills, and critical thinking. At the end of the semester, students will be able to communicate effectively and appropriately, which will allow them greater ease in expressing their thoughts and feelings.
 
English I - 9th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
High school freshmen will be led to develop analytical reading, academic writing, critical thinking and presentation skills. Course content includes myth, short stories, poetry, drama, and novels. Analytic reading instruction will extend understanding of literary elements and language. Writing instruction will extend development in various modes writing including narrative, expository and argumentative. In addition, students will develop skills in critical thinking, effective discourse, collaboration and reflection. Outside and summer reading are required.
 
English I Honors - 9th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Previous levels of English and selection criteria
Students will follow the scope and sequence for the Academic 9th grade course with the addition of particular and specific attention to Pre-AP® standards and rigor set forth by the College Board in preparation for the rigor of Advanced Placement classes in high school. Outside and summer reading are required.
 
English II - 10th Grade World Literature
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
High school sophomores will learn specific writing skills and demonstrate their academic writing competence in various course assessments and projects. Course content includes short stories, poetry, drama and novels as well as a number of non-fiction essays and writings. Analytical reading instruction will extend understanding of literary elements and language. Writing instruction will extend development in various modes of writing. In addition, students will develop skills in critical thinking, effective discourse, collaboration and reflection. Outside and summer reading are required.
 
English II Honors - 10th Grade World Literature
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Previous levels of English and selection criteria
Students will follow the scope and sequence for the Academic 10th grade course with the addition of particular and specific attention to Pre-AP® standards and rigor set forth by the College Board in preparation for the rigor of Advanced Placement classes in high school. Outside and summer reading are required.
 
English III - 11th Grade American Literature and Composition
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
High school juniors will encounter the American literary heritage from its beginning to the present. They will become familiar with the traditions from different periods in literature while reading essays, poetry, short fiction and various historical speeches and essays. Analytical reading instruction will extend understanding of literary elements and language. Writing instruction will extend development in various modes of writing. In addition, students will develop skills in critical thinking, effective discourse, collaboration and reflection. Outside and summer reading are required.
 
English III AP® - 11th Grade Language and Composition
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Previous levels of English and selection criteria.
The rigor of this college level course requires students to write in persuasive and argumentative styles as well as a variety of modes and for various audiences. Course content emphasizes analysis of rhetorical techniques and their application to a variety of writing situations. Students will also develop skills in collaboration and communication. Outside and summer reading are required. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.
 
English IV - 12th Grade British Literature and Composition
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course prepares students for the reading, thinking, writing, and research tasks encountered in college course-work. Students will read, analyze and synthesize complex literary works and non-fiction prose to formulate their own academic arguments. Analytical reading instruction will extend understanding of literary elements and language. Writing instruction will extend development in various modes of writing. In addition, students will develop skills in critical thinking, effective discourse, collaboration and reflection. SAT vocabulary continues to be a focus. Outside and summer reading are required.
 
English IV AP® - 12th Grade Literature and Composition
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Previous levels of English and selection criteria
In this college level course, students explore literary works from different periods. Careful attention is given to close reading of literary texts and to their historical context. Students are expected to read complex texts with understanding and to write complex prose that communicates effectively with mature readers. In addition, students will develop skills in critical thinking, effective discourse, collaboration and reflection. Summer and extensive outside reading are required. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.
 
Creative and Imaginative Writing 9th - 12th Grade
.5 or 1 Credit ~ 1 or 2 Semesters
This interesting and diverse study of creative and imaginative writing allows high school students to develop increased skill, creativity, and versatility as writers. In the class, students will be provided the time to write independently and to share and critique their writings with others. In their efforts to perfect selected pieces of work, students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the reflective nature of the writing process, applying the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English. Throughout the year, students will study and create from a variety of genres such as essays, short stories, poetry, and drama to stretch and improve their writing abilities. As a means of extending their knowledge of effective and creative techniques and forms of writing, students will be afforded the opportunity to create and publish the school’s literary magazine using pieces of their own written work, art and photography.
 
Film as Literature 9th - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Film as Literature is a course designed to allow students to experience different types of films as works of literature. Drama, comedy, science fiction/fantasy, short films, documentaries and other films worthy of study will be included within the coursework. Students will be expected to write persuasive, analytical and compare/contrast essays. Class time will include film viewing, class discussions, lectures, reading, response writing, and group projects.
 
Journalism I 9th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to engage in an in-depth, hands-on experience in journalism and the news writing process. Students will learn various article formats and work towards developing their own voice using various writing styles. Students will be responsible for the planning, design, and publication of the online school newspaper. This production process will involve news, sports, and feature writing, page and graphic design, photography, and business management.
 
Journalism II 10th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Journalism I
This course will build on and expand the knowledge and techniques learned in Journalism I. Students will serve as mentors for Journalism I students, modeling interviewing and editing techniques, coaching them in writing, and provide guidance as needed. Journalism II students will serve as section editors for the school online newspaper, focusing on advanced layout techniques, photojournalism, and broadcast journalism.
 
Journalism III - Honors 11th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Journalism I and II
Students will take the leadership roles for the online student newspaper and serve as Managing Editors. Along with continuing their own writing and column assignments, they will create assignments for the newspaper staff, brainstorm ideas for features and special pages, take the lead in assigning video news packages for broadcast news, and work to promote the news department to the student body of Northland. They will also work with the Broadcast News Editors to create a cohesive program. Students will also have the opportunity to compete at Journalism writing completions.
 
AP Capstone™ Program
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
AP Capstone™ is an innovative diploma program from the College Board that equips students with the independent research, collaborative teamwork, and communication skills. AP Capstone™ is built on the foundation of two AP® courses, AP® Seminar and AP® Research, and is designed to complement and enhance the in-depth, discipline-specific study experienced in other AP courses. These courses develop students’ skills in research, analysis, evidence-based arguments, collaboration, writing, and presenting. Students who complete the two-year program can earn one of two different AP Capstone awards – AP Seminar & Research Certificate (3 or higher on AP® Seminar & AP® Research) or AP Capstone Diploma (certificate requirements + 3 or higher on four additional AP exams), which are valued by colleges across the United States and around the world.
 
AP® Seminar 10th - 12th Grade
1 Credit 2 Semesters
AP® Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular investigations of real-world topics from multiple perspectives, gathering and analyzing information from various sources in order to develop credible and valid evidence-based arguments. AP® Seminar is a prerequisite for AP® Research.
 
AP® Research 11th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: AP® Seminar
AP® Research prepares students to design, plan, and implement a yearlong, independent investigation to address a research question and cultivate the skills and discipline to establish their plan, document their processes, and produce a process and reflection portfolio which showcases their scholarly work. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4,000-5,000 words (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product) and a presentation with an oral defense.
Two-Dimensional Animation
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Digital Art I.
This class is for those students that want to turn their still images into moving, breathing creations. Programs such as Adobe Flash will be used to teach many different animation techniques from simple moving graphics to animating cartoons and voice.
 
Three-Dimensional Modeling
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Digital Art I.
This class explores the use of sculpting and 3D modeling tools to create digital sculptures. The students will develop skills in Google Sketch-Up and Blender to create digital models for presentations, animations, concept art, and architecture.
 
Art I
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Art I is for students without previous high school visual arts experience. It includes a general overview of art concepts and some art history, as well as a variety of studio experiences. Students will also spend a great deal of time learning human proportions and drawing techniques.
 
Art II
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Art I.
Art II provides the opportunity for students to experience a deeper exploration of traditional media and experimentation of new media. Students will also learn to talk and write about their own art and the art of others through critiques and studying historically important works.
 
Art III Honors
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Art II.
Art III delves deeper into the study of art as an expressive tool throughout history. Students will explore historical art styles and how they reflect and affect their respective societies. The purpose of art will also be questioned and the students will write their own philosophies on what they believe art to be and how it fits into their lives.
 
Art IV Honors
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Art III or Digital Art II.
Art IV provides an opportunity for serious art students to create works of art on a much larger scale. It also provides the opportunity for the creation of a portfolio that will be helpful when applying for future opportunities in the field of art. Art IV provides more freedom in the selection of mediums and subject matter.
 
Digital Photography I
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Digital Photography I emphasizes visualization and composition skills, as well as the technical aspects of photography. Students practice taking photographs and improving them in Lightroom and Photoshop. Group critiques enable them to think and talk about photography with an eye to improving their own work. Outstanding photographs will be displayed and entered in competitions.
 
Digital Photography II
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Digital Photography I.
A continuation and extension of Digital Photography I, Digital Photography II enables students to concentrate on expression and to explore photography concepts in more depth. Digital Photography II explores the advanced techniques of Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop.
 
Digital Photography III Honors
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Digital Photography I & II.
Students in their third year of Digital Photography choose an area of specialization and spend a semester creating a portfolio that demonstrates mastery and growth in that subject or technique. Completion of two different semester-long inquiries prepares students to tackle the Advanced Placement 2D Design Portfolio.
 
Digital Photography IV Honors
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Digital Photography I, II & III.
The student and teacher work out an individualized program of exploration and discovery in photography. A portfolio of work suitable for application to a university or art school photography program will be completed.
 
Digital Art I
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and Flash, along with Corel Painter are used to explore graphic design and expressive content for a digital world. Students will explore how their art fits into a digital world and create works of art for the web and for live shows.
 
Digital Art II
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Digital Art I.
Digital Art II gives students much more freedom to explore different digital media of their choice. Students will also study graphic design and digital painting more in depth.
 
Sculpture I
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Art I.
The goal of this class is for students to learn how apply the principles and elements of art to a 3 dimensional space. This class offers students a different way of thinking about how to create artwork by exploring materials such as but not limited to clay, stone, plastic, cardboard, and tape. Sculpture will give students with an aversion to 2 dimensional art classes another option for a visual arts class in high school. This class is not to build a consistent body of work, but to build a knowledge of how to use the materials so that in the future, a body of work may develop.
 
AP® Studio Art
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required.
Students must submit an application and be approved by the teacher. For highly motivated students with at least two years of high school Art. AP® Studio Art offers the opportunity to earn college credit. By completing twenty-four high quality pieces, students advance to new levels of technical proficiency and expressive strength. Portfolios are graded by the College Board in a digital submission format. Students are responsible for the AP® Exam fee which is determined annually by the College Board.
 
Theatre Arts High School - Theatre I, II
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Theatre Arts is designed to assist students in discovering the dramatic skills necessary to develop their creative talents. This is done through participating in Northland Theatre productions and classroom acting activities and performances. Theatre I and II are designed for the beginning acting student and give a basis of knowledge of theatre to build upon. Skills learned in class will include an introduction to improvisation, movement, character analysis, scene work, monologues, elements of comedy & drama, analysis of dramatic literature, and technical theatre.
 
Theatre Arts High School - Theatre Honors III, IV
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite & Limitations: Theatre I and II
Theatre Arts is designed to assist students in discovering the dramatic skills necessary to develop their creative talents. This is done through participating in Northland Theatre productions and classroom acting activities and performances. Theatre Honors III and IV are designed to develop the skills of more experienced actors and actresses. Skills learned in class will include improvisation, movement, voice & diction, various acting theories, scene work, monologues, advanced analysis of dramatic literature, and advanced technical theatre. 
 
Orchestra I, II - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Students should have completed two full years of study on their instrument.
Incoming students may be required to pass a proficiency test for admittance into the class. This class is designed to emphasize the art of ensemble playing for stringed instruments and expand on the student’s previous learning experience. Emphasis will be placed on musicality, the ensemble setting, and performance practice. Example performance venues might include chapel, a Christmas concert, spring concert, etc. Qualified students may be invited to participate in quartets or small ensembles outside the overall group.
 
Orchestra Honors III, IV - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Two years High School Orchestra.
The honors level is for students who are participating in Orchestra for the third or fourth year in high school. Students are expected to serve as leaders and mentors to other students while advancing their own skills to a higher level.
 
Choir I, II - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Students enrolled in Choir will express themselves musically while developing healthy vocal technique through daily group vocal instruction. Choir students will perform music in several different languages and many different styles as they build music reading skills. Due to travel requirements for competitions and performances, students should be in good academic standing. Uniform purchase required.
 
Choir Honors III, IV - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Two years High School Choir.
Honors level Choir credit is available for students who are participating in High School Choir for a third or fourth year. Honors level students are expected to serve as leaders and mentors to other students while advancing their own skills to a higher level.
 
Performance Workshop I, II - High School
.5 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Audition required. Concurrent enrollment in High School Choir required.
Performance Workshop (also known as “Vocal Point”) is Northland’s premiere vocal ensemble. The group selected will perform a broad spectrum of musical styles. Students will also benefit from group and individual voice instruction. Students enrolled in this class will participate in TPSMEA All-State Choir auditions and Solo & Ensemble competitions. Due to travel requirements for competitions and performances, students should be in good academic standing. Uniform purchase required.
 
Performance Workshop Honors III, IV High School
.5 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Audition required. Performance Workshop I and II, concurrent enrollment in High School Choir required.
Performance Workshop (also known as “Vocal Point”), is Northland’s premiere vocal ensemble. The group selected will perform a broad spectrum of musical styles. Students will also benefit from group and individual voice instruction. Students enrolled in this class will participate in TPSMEA All-State Choir auditions and Solo & Ensemble competitions. Honors level credit is available for students who are participating for a third or fourth year. Honors level students are expected to serve as leaders and mentors to other students while advancing their own skills to a higher level. Due to travel requirements for competitions and performances, students should be in good academic standing. Uniform purchase required.
 
Honors Music Theory - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 semesters
This full-year course is for 9-12 grade high school students seeking to go more in depth in their understanding of how music works. Students will learn how to read, write and analyze music. Students will also be able to compose music and understand guidelines used in music composed by others in the Western Civilization style of music. Students should possess some basic music theory foundational knowledge and although not required, it is preferred for students to be a member of a musical performing ensemble at Northland.
 
AP® Music Theory
1 Credit ~ 2 semesters
Prerequisite: Music Theory AP Placement exam, at least 2 years prior participation in an upper-level performance ensemble and/or private music lessons. Basic knowledge of pitch and rhythm fundamentals.
This course is for the serious music student who is planning on pursuing a Music Major or Minor in college. Piano/keyboard experience is very beneficial, but not required. This class will cover music composition, analysis, melodic and harmonic dictation and basic keyboard skills, also incorporating sight reading using Kodaly solfege syllables. The last weeks of the course are dedicated toward the final preparation and practice for the AP® Music Theory examination. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students may receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by the College Board. Students may be required to purchase software for their laptops. Offered every other year. Next offering will be in the 2020-2021 school year.
 
Yearbook I, II - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required.
Yearbook staff members must submit an application and be approved by the faculty advisor. Working together to create an actual product, students get experience in writing, photography, editing, sales leadership and time management. Working on the yearbook staff provides experience that applies directly to the world of work. The staff attends a summer workshop on the campus of Texas A&M University. Incoming staff members should contact Mrs. Stork for workshop information.
 
Yearbook Honors III, IV - High School
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Two years High School Yearbook. Application required.
Yearbook staff members must submit an application and be approved by the faculty advisor. Working together to create an actual product, students get experience in writing, photography, editing, sales leadership and time management. Working on the yearbook staff provides experience that applies directly to the world of work. The staff attends a summer workshop on the campus of Texas A&M University. Incoming staff members should contact Mrs. Stork for workshop information. Third and fourth year staff members are expected to serve as leaders and mentors to other students while advancing their own skills to a higher level.

Spanish I
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course is an introduction to the Spanish language and assumes no previous knowledge or limited knowledge. The class will use Spanish in speaking, writing, reading and listening skills. The students will be given opportunities to use the language through games, drama, celebrations, and special projects.
 
Spanish II
1 Credit ~2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Spanish I or permission from the teacher.
This course is a continuation of Spanish I. The students will continue to use the language in speaking, writing, reading and listening skills – with a deeper exploration into the written language. The students will be given opportunities to use the language in holiday projects, role-plays, games, videos, and stories.
 
Spanish III - Honors
1 Credit ~2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Spanish II or permission from the teacher.
This course is a continuation of Spanish II. The students will delve deeper into the spoken language, literature and writing skills. The students will also study cultural similarities and differences as well as geography and history of Spanish speaking nations. The students will be given opportunities to display their skills using videos, audio materials, and student-centered projects to share with lower level students.
 
Spanish IV - Honors
1 Credit ~2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Spanish III and Selection criteria
Spanish IV is designed as a continuation of Spanish III. In-depth study of the language and grammar will be emphasized along with literature, history, customs, traditions and current events.
 
AP® Spanish
1 Credit ~2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Spanish III, Spanish IV, or by teacher recommendation and Selection criteria.
This advanced course focuses on Spanish for active communication — concentration is specifically on using and fine tuning verbal skills as well as writing expository compositions. Major emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and speaking using ‘real-life’ texts, interviews, and short stories. The varied accents, vocabulary and idiom usage from different Latin countries are discussed and used as well. The last weeks of the course are dedicated toward the final preparation and practice for the AP® Spanish Language examination. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.
 
Mandarin Chinese I
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course is an introduction to the Chinese language and culture in this course. The basic objectives are to help each student attain an acceptable degree of proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and to present the language within the context of contemporary Chinese culture. Chinese characters will be introduced systematically as they are related to the listening/speaking activities conducted throughout the course.
 
Mandarin Chinese II
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Mandarin Chinese I
Mandarin II is a continuation course of Mandarin I. This course will help students further develop proficiency in Mandarin and expand knowledge of Chinese culture across the five standards: communication, culture, connection, comparisons, and community. Students will refine their tones and pronunciation, increase their vocabulary, and produce sentences with various grammatical structures. Emphasis will be placed upon practical use of Chinese through exposure to authentic texts such as short narratives, signage, tickets, and brochures. Students are expected to be more expressive in daily conversation about broader topics, such as school life, daily schedule, shopping, likes and dislikes of various items, transportation, and be able to read short essays. Cultural activities including legend-related crafts and ethnic food origins will be introduced to enhance students’ cultural awareness.

World Geography - 9th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This survey course investigates the physical, cultural, religious, economic, and human geography of the world. Students see parallels in the physical, political and cultural development of nations and note the differences that make regions unique. Emphasis is made on the history of humankind from the development of early civilization to the Black Plague. The study is flexible to allow for reevaluation of past events in light of more current events. Students are exposed to various cultures from Eastern, African, and Western civilizations.

World History - 10th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This survey course focuses on the history of humankind from This survey course focuses on the history of humankind from the development of agriculture to the present time. Students see parallels in development across nations and note the differences that make nations unique. The study of World History is flexible to allow for reevaluation of past events in light of more current events. Students are exposed to cultures of Eastern, African, and Western nations. As the history of the world is taught, the cultural and physical aspects of geography are reviewed with relation to the countries involved.

 AP® World History - 10th, 11th, or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This full-year course is for the high school student who wishes to earn college credit through a rigorous academic program. This class approaches history in a nontraditional way in that it looks at the common threads of humanity over time: trade, religion, politics, society and technology and it investigates how these things have changed and continued over time in different places. Five themes will be used as a frame of reference in the chronological study of world history. These themes are: Interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.

U.S. History - 11th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course picks up where 8th Grade US History leaves off with the Aftermath of the Civil War and the Reconstruction of the United States. In this survey of the second half of US History, students will demonstrate an in depth and complex understanding of the significant details and concepts of post-Civil War America to the present, covering Progressivism, American Imperialism, both World Wars and the Cold War among other relevant topics. The vision of the class is to connect relevant concepts from our past to current issues and conversations we are still having today in our country.

U.S. History Dual Credit - 11th Grade HIST 1301 & HIST 1302
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Selection criteria.
HIST 1301  (1st semester) is a survey of U.S. History from the Age of Discovery through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Special emphasis is placed on the emergence of the United States as a nation. Other topics will include westward expansion, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an interpretive analysis of the social, economic, political, and intellectual dynamics that shaped United States history before 1877.

HIST 1302 (second semester) is a survey of U.S. History from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the emergence of the United States as a world power and our subsequent assumption of international responsibilities. Other topics will include westward expansion, industrialization, immigration, World War I, World War II, the subsequent Cold War, Vietnam, and the collapse of the Soviet Empire. HIST 1301 and 1302 earn six college credit hours through Lone Star College. Dual Credit courses require an additional fee which is determined by Lone Star College.

Government - 12th Grade
.5 Credit 1 Semester
American Government will provide a foundation in the science of government to increase student knowledge and skills in all facets of government. Students will understand their right to exercise more control over government at all levels. The course will be comprised of the following: the basic principles on which American government is based; insight into the origins, history, and structure of government; issues of the American system; political groups and parties; the American system at local, state and national levels; the relationship among local, state and national levels; the interaction among the three branches of the national government; and, the rights, freedoms and responsibilities of American citizens. Prominence will be given to the Constitution of the United States. American Government will seek to help students understand these course elements and to recognize how each applies to them personally to enable each to exercise his or her franchise thoughtfully and effectively.

AP® U.S. Government and Politics - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
AP® Government will provide students with an increased understanding of the American political system, its framework, institutions, groups, traditions, beliefs, values, and ideas. Students will examine in detail the major processes and institutions through which the political system functions, as well as some of the public policies that are established and how these policies are implemented. Completing the required readings, taking detailed notes, and being prepared to take weekly reading quizzes is necessary for success in this course. Students will also be expected to answer free response essays on a weekly basis. The goal is for the student to complete college level work in a college level environment. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.

Economics - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Economics emphasizes the free enterprise system. The focus is on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the United States and a comparison with those in other countries around the world. Students examine the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses. Students analyze the interaction of supply, demand, and price and study the role of financial institutions in a free enterprise system. Types of business ownership and market structures are discussed, as are basic concepts of consumer economics.

AP® Macroeconomics - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
AP® Economics will enable students to gain an understanding of how the United States economy works and how it relates to the economies of other countries. Students will examine economic concepts including production possibilities, supply and demand, comparative advantage, foreign exchange, GDP, unemployment, loanable funds, fiscal policy, monetary policy and taxes. Practicing graphs, taking detailed notes, and being prepared to take comprehensive unit exams are necessary behaviors for success in this course. The goal is for the student to complete college level work in a college level environment. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board. 

Humanities Dual Credit - HUMA 1301 & HUMA 1302
11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Selection criteria.
HUMA 1301 (Prehistory to Gothic) is a study of interpretation of human experience through an introduction to music, literature, the visual arts, history, and philosophy. Focus is on gaining practical experience in inquiry, recognition, and assessment. 
HUMA 1302 (Early Renaissance to the Present) is an interdisciplinary, multi-perspective assessment of cultural, political, philosophical, and aesthetic factors critical to the formulation of values and the historical development of the individual and society.
HUMA 1301 and HUMA 1302 earn six college credit hours through Lone Star College. Dual Credit courses require an additional fee which is determined by Lone Star College.

Psychology I - 10th - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
This semester-long course will examine psychology as a scientific discipline. Students will be introduced to the beginnings of psychology and the biological origins of psychology by studying the mind and the developmental process. Sensations and perceptions will follow the biological origins of psychology. This course will help students relate psychology into everyday scenarios.

Special Topics in Social Studies: Psychology II (social and behavioral)
10th - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Prerequisite and Limitations: Psychology I
This semester-long course will build upon the biological foundation developed in Psychology I. Students learn about social psychology, emotions, drives, personality disorders, and therapy. This course will also focus on relating psychology to everyday situations and developing the ability to apply these psychological ideas to social situations and future careers.

AP® Psychology - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
The AP® Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. The class will spark the students interest in human behavior. Well known psychologists such as Freud, Skinner, Pavlov, Rogers, Maslow, and Hurlock will be introduced and discussed throughout the course in order to learn why humans behave the way they do. This course will combine both projects and research as well as exams in order to prepare each student for the AP® Exam. We will engage topics from development and biology to learning, personality, and disorders. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.

Algebra I - 9th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Algebra I reinforces concepts learned in PreAlgebra (such as solving multi-step equations and linear graphing) and expands into solving systems of equations and inequalities, factoring and simplifying polynomials, solving quadratic equations and working with exponents and radicals. Students are given a foundation for concepts that will be learned in Geometry, Algebra II and PreCalculus. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

Geometry - Academic 9th or 10th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course is classic Euclidean geometry, including parallel lines, triangles, congruence, similarity, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles and solids. Use of algebra is incorporated throughout the course. Formal proofs as well as trigonometry will be used in multiple units of study. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

Geometry - Honors 9th or 10th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Selection criteria.
This course includes all of the concepts in Academic Geometry, but with greater depth and complexity. Additional topics will include formal logic, special segments in triangles, midsegments of trapezoids and kites. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

Algebra II - Academic 10th or 11th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Algebra II includes the concepts of solving open sentences with one or more variables, algebraic operations with polynomials and rational expressions, properties of functions, matrices and determinants, graphing, quadratic and higher degree functions, complex numbers, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and probability. Technological applications of these topics will be  integrated into the course. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

Algebra II - Honors 10th or 11th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Selection criteria.
Algebra II Honors focuses on the algebraic concepts of  solving open sentences of different degrees, polynomials and rational expressions, function analysis, matrices and determinants, graphing, complex numbers, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and probability. This course emphasizes higher-level thinking and problem solving. Applications and technology are integrated into this course. This course is designed as preparation for PreCalculus or PreCalculus Honors. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

PreCalculus - Academic 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Precalculus contains elements of trigonometry, analytic geometry, function analysis and graphing, sequences and series, and advanced algebraic topics. This course is designed as preparation for AP Calculus AB, Honors Calculus, or AP Statistics. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

PreCalculus - Honors 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Algebra II and selection criteria.
Precalculus Honors includes the study of trigonometry, analytic geometry, and function analysis. In-depth study of functions, graphs, advanced algebraic topics, proofs, and applications is emphasized in their relation to calculus. This course is designed as preparation for AP Calculus AB or BC or AP Statistics. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

Calculus - Honors 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: PreCalculus or PreCalculus Honors and Selection criteria.
This course is primarily intended for students intending to major in business or the social sciences in college. Calculus is the study of rates of change of various functions and their applications. In our development of the Calculus we will study applications to business, including the cost, revenue and profit functions as well as various social science applications such as rates of learning, population growth and equity of income distribution. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required.

AP® Calculus - AB 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: PreCalculus Honors and Selection criteria.
Calculus applies the study of limits, derivatives, integrals, and functions to various applications. Using calculus as a problem-solving tool and preparation for taking the Calculus AB exam is emphasized in this course. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.

AP® Calculus - BC 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: PreCalculus and Selection criteria.
The primary goal and intended audience for this course is the same as for Calculus AP® – AB; however this is a more intense course as it covers the additional topics of convergence and divergence of infinite series, applications of Calculus to both polar and parametric functions, logistic growth and additional methods of finding antiderivatives. A TI-84 graphing calculator is required. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board. This course is subject to both teacher and scheduling availability and having sufficient students to make a viable class.

College Algebra - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Selection criteria.
Students will review material covered on the TSI (Texas Success Initiative) math placement test, which covers four content areas: 1. Elementary Algebra and Functions (Algebra I), 2. Intermediate Algebra and Functions (Algebra II), 3. Geometry and Measurement, and 4. Data Analysis, Statistics and Probability. Students will also complete an in-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, absolute-value, piecewise defined, exponential and logarithmic functions, equations, inequalities, graphing skills and systems of equations using matrices.

Introduction to Dual Credit College Algebra - 11th or 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Prerequisite and Limitations: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Selection criteria.
The goal of this class is to prepare students to take College Algebra Dual Credit (online). In-depth study of prerequisite knowledge needed for College Algebra as well as an overview of topics covered in College Algebra.

College Algebra - Dual Credit (online) MATH 1314  11th or 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Prerequisite and Limitations: Introduction to Dual Credit College Algebra and Selection criteria.
Students who qualify for dual credit on the TSI math placement test will be taking this class (MATH 1314) online from Lone Star College. These students will be placed in the classroom with an instructor who will act as a facilitator. In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, absolute-value, piecewise defined, exponential and logarithmic functions, equations, inequalities, graphing skills and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, conics and inverses may be included. Dual Credit courses require an additional fee which is determined by Lone Star College.

AP® Statistics - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Honors Algebra II with Teacher Recommendation or PreCalculus.
The AP® Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP® Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding. The College Board AP® Exam is required of students at the end of the year. Students will receive college credit based upon the advanced placement policy of the college they choose to attend. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by The College Board.

Boys Athletics - Fall
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
First semester strength and conditioning course with team emphasis for individuals participating in basketball, cross country, football, soccer or off-season Spring sport preparation. (Students enrolled in athletics may not enroll in an additional strength and conditioning class.) 

Boys Athletics - Spring
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Second semester strength and conditioning course with team emphasis for individuals participating in baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, tennis, track and field or off-season Fall sport preparation. (Students enrolled in athletics may not enroll in an additional strength and conditioning class.) 

Girls Athletics - Fall
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
First semester strength and conditioning course with team emphasis for individuals participating in basketball, cheerleading, cross country, soccer, volleyball or off-season Spring sport preparation. (Students enrolled in athletics may not enroll in an additional strength and conditioning class.) 

Girls Athletics - Spring
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Second semester strength and conditioning course with team emphasis for individuals participating in basketball, cheerleading, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track and field or off-season Fall sport preparation. (Students enrolled in athletics may not enroll in an additional strength and conditioning class.) 

Strength & Conditioning
.5 or 1 Credit ~ 1 or 2 Semesters
Students will follow an individual program designed to improve their physical strength, muscle endurance, and cardiovascular endurance. The training will take place on the track, in the gym, and in the weight room.

Manager/Trainer
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Prerequisite and Limitations: Candidates are typically selected and approved by head coach of applicable sport.
Student athletic trainers and student managers will gain knowledge and skills required in careers in the health care and management industry. Responsibilities of this job include but are not limited to the following: maintenance of the first aid kits, equipment checks, fill water bottles and ice chest, aid in the treatment of injuries, taping and updating supply lists. The Manager/Trainer will be required to attend all practices and games.   

Biology - 9th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This is a college preparatory laboratory science course based on regular laboratory and field investigations that include a study of structure and function of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. Topics of study include biochemistry, microscopy, cell structure and function, cellular energetics, cellular reproduction, genetics and heredity, taxonomy and classification, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, animals, ecology, and human body systems. A special emphasis is placed on laboratory investigations including microscopic techniques, entomology, data collection and analysis, and laboratory dissection techniques with an extensive pig dissection which culminates in a large scale lab practical exam.

Biology Honors - 9th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Selection criteria.
This is a college preparatory laboratory science course that prepares students to be successful in an AP® Biology course. The course is based on understanding science as a process to help students begin to develop a conceptual framework for modern biology. Students will perform regular laboratory and field investigations that include a study of structure and function of living organisms and their interactions with the environment. Topics of study include biochemistry, microscopy, cell structure and function, cellular energetics, cellular reproduction, genetics and heredity, taxonomy and classification, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, animals, ecology, and human body systems. A special emphasis is placed on problem solving, written communication of concepts and observations, microscopic techniques, entomology, data collection and analysis, and laboratory dissection techniques with an extensive pig dissection which culminates in a large scale lab practical exam.

Biology AP® 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Biology, Chemistry and selection criteria.
The AP® Biology course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course designed to enable students to develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing a plan for collecting data, analyzing data, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts in and across domains. The key concepts and related content that define the AP® Biology course and exam are organized around a few underlying principles called the big ideas, which encompass the core scientific principles, theories and processes governing living organisms and biological systems. The four big ideas that will be studied in this class are: Cellular Energy and Communication, Evolution, Genetics and Information Transfer, and Biological Interactions. Students will complete at least 10 multi-day lab investigations that reinforce the big ideas and encourage the development of scientific inquiry and reasoning skills. Completion of this course will prepare students for the AP® Biology exam. AP® Biology is historically a challenging and difficult class; therefore, students selecting this course should be highly motivated, self-disciplined and inquisitive. Students enrolled in AP® courses are required to take the AP® exam. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by the College Board.

Chemistry - 10th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
The academic level of chemistry is designed for the student who will have a non-science college major. The student needs a mastery of basic algebra concepts. The topics covered in this course are dimensional analysis and International System unit conversions, history of atomic theory, structure of the atom, bonding, naming compounds, balancing equations, stoichiometry, states of matter and energy changes, gases, solutions, and acid/base systems. When time allows, oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry will be introduced. These topics are sufficiently introduced but not with the depth of honors chemistry.

Chemistry - Honors  10th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Biology and selection criteria.
The honors chemistry course is geared for the student who will be majoring in engineering, pre-med, or a technology related field in college. Honors chemistry is math based and uses dimensional analysis throughout the course. Topics covered in this course are the International System of units, the periodic table, history of the atom, structure of the atom, bonding, naming compounds, balancing equations, stoichiometry, predicting, states of matter and energy changes, gases, solutions, and acid/base systems. An introduction of oxidations-reduction reaction and electrochemistry may also be covered. The honors chemistry student should be a self-motivated learner and have a strong math background.

AP® Chemistry - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Biology, Chemistry and selection criteria.
AP® Chemistry is a course that deals with chemistry topics at a college level. The topics and laboratory work covered in AP® Chemistry are those specified by the College Board™. Students are expected to have previous knowledge of significant figures with measurements and calculations, scientific laws concerning matter, atomic theory, compounds and nomenclature, balancing equations, oxidation-reduction reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, and acidic and basic systems. These topics will be reviewed during the first three weeks of the course. Other topics that are covered in more depth are quantum numbers, periodic relationships, geometry of molecules, intermolecular forces, predicting products and balancing equations, states of matter, spontaneity of reactions, kinetics, equilibrium (general, acid/base, and solution), and electrochemistry. There are sixteen experiments required by the College Board for the AP® chemistry student. Students must have one year of a laboratory based chemistry class before taking AP chemistry. Students entering NCS must have proof of 8-10 completed laboratory investigations. Students must be able to attend class 90% of the time in order to adequately participate in lab. The AP® Chemistry student should have very strong math skills and be self-directed, self-motivated, and willing to read and study independently. Students enrolled in AP® courses are required to take the AP® exam. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by the College Board.

Physics - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: concurrent or previous enrollment in Algebra II, and selection criteria.
Physics is a physical science concerned with the relationships between matter and energy. The ultimate goal of physics is to explain physical processes in terms of simple interactions and simple particles. The four main subdivisions of physics are: mechanics and thermal energy; wave motion; electricity; and nuclear and particle physics. This course will involve a considerable amount of laboratory experience. Investigations will be both qualitative and quantitative in nature and will require manipulation of apparatus, observation, gathering of data, processing data and interpreting the data to form conclusions. Topics of study include (but are not limited to) measurement, dimensional analysis and units, statics, vectors, calculational techniques, momentum, “Galilean” relativity, center of mass, Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy, power, conservative forces, simple oscillator, mechanical waves, gravity, Newton’s Law of Gravity, Inverse Square Law, static electricity, charge and electric fields, Coulomb’s Law, electric energy, conductors and capacitors, basic circuit theory, magnetic fields, induction, light and optics, and select topics in modern physics. Students will learn to clearly communicate their scientific work, a critical skill for today’s workplace, through work in small cooperative groups, presentations of projects, homework problem solutions, and writing lab reports. This course will include a variety of activities to reach students with varied learning styles, including several cooperative group activities to help students solidify their own physics knowledge by teaching their peers.

Physics Honors - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Concurrent or previous enrollment in PreCalculus and selection criteria.
Physics is a physical science concerned with the relationships between matter and energy. The ultimate goal of physics is to explain physical processes in terms of simple interactions and simple particles. The four main subdivisions of physics are: mechanics and thermal energy; wave motion; electricity; and nuclear and particle physics. This course will involve a considerable amount of laboratory experience. Investigations will be both qualitative and quantitative in nature and will require manipulation of apparatus, observation, gathering of data, processing data and interpreting the data to form conclusions. The Honors level involves a more mathematical treatment of the topics covered, which include measurement, dimensional analysis and units, statics, vectors, calculational techniques, momentum, “Galilean” relativity, center of mass, Newton’s Laws, conservation of energy, power, conservative forces, simple oscillator, mechanical waves, gravity and impetus, Newton’s Law of Gravity, Inverse Square Law, static electricity, charge and electric fields, Coulomb’s Law, electric energy, conductors and capacitors, basic circuit theory, magnetic fields, induction, light and optics, and select topics in modern physics. Students will learn to clearly communicate their scientific work, a critical skill for today’s workplace, through work in small cooperative groups, presentations of projects, homework problem solutions, and writing lab reports. This course will include a variety of activities to reach students with varied learning styles, including several cooperative group activities to help students solidify their own physics knowledge by teaching their peers. This course will serve as preparation for AP® Physics C Mechanics.

AP® Physics C-Mechanics - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Successful completion of Physics Honors, concurrent or previous enrollment in Calculus and selection criteria.
AP® Physics C-Mechanics is a rigorous college level course designed to be equivalent to the first semester of a typical college Physics course. Major areas of study include kinematics, forces and motion, work and energy, systems of particles, rotational dynamics and statics, gravitation, and oscillations. Calculus is used throughout the course to unify concepts and develop the theoretical framework for the course. Students will develop their critical thinking and problem solving skills in a variety of ways. Understanding concepts and connections will be emphasized over memorizing equations. Homework and in-class activities will offer students opportunities to apply physics knowledge in new and meaningful ways. Students will utilize technology, from computer simulation and data analysis software to calculator and computer data collection equipment, in order to connect the physics they are studying to real-world situations. Students will learn to clearly communicate their scientific work, a critical skill for today’s workplace, through work in small cooperative groups, presentations of projects, homework problem solutions, and writing lab reports. This course will include a variety of activities to reach students with varied learning styles, including several cooperative group activities to help students solidify their own physics knowledge by teaching their peers. This course follows all College Board guidelines and serves as preparation for the AP® Physics C-Mechanics exam. Students enrolled in AP® courses are required to take the AP® exam. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by the College Board.

Anatomy/Physiology - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This is a college preparatory laboratory science course which investigates the similarities and differences in the form and function of living organisms. This course will examine the gross anatomy of the systems of the human body, histology, fundamental concepts of physiology, and related terminology. This course concentrates on the body at a microscopic level and then moves on to the individual systems including integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Along with these topics, students will explore current scientific issues so that they have direct access to new developments in the field of anatomy and physiology. A great deal of emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences including advanced microscopic techniques, chicken wing dissection, cow eye dissection, sheep brain dissection, sheep heart dissection, and an extensive feral cat dissection which culminates in a large scale lab practical exam.

Forensic Science - 11th or 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Forensic Science is an upper level course that utilizes other science disciplines such as biology, chemistry, physical science and earth science to solve crime scenes. The course is rich in exploration and lab investigation. Students work in teams and individually to separate, isolate and identify physical and chemical materials and analyze biological evidence. Topics that are covered include: fingerprinting; DNA; blood analysis; casts and impressions; arson investigation; entomology and ballistics.

Technology Applications - High School
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Students will explore many software applications and learn to create products for personal, school, and business use. Topics covered will include: keyboarding skills practice, word processing and publication layout (both Apple Pages and Microsoft Word), multimedia presentations (both Apple Keynote and Microsoft Powerpoint), and spreadsheet functions (both Apple Numbers and Microsoft Excel), copyright awareness, ethics of technology use, and online research skills. Students will practice using other technology tools such as scanners, digital cameras, and video cameras.

Computer Science I - Honors  9th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
This course will introduce students to several programming languages; selections have included Scratch, Jeroo, Python and Java. Students will focus on problem solving skills in each of the languages explored. Topics will include computer history, programming basics, object-oriented programming and user interfaces. Through collaborative and individual projects, students will practice programming variables, data types, and control structures in an object-oriented style.

AP® Computer Science Principles 10th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Algebra I and teacher recommendation
This course is designed to be equivalent to a first-semester introductory college computing course. Students will develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines. Students are encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computational artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. They will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community, society, and the world. This course follows all College Board guidelines and serves as preparation for the AP® Computer Science Principles exam. The AP® exam for this course includes 2 through-course project assessments in addition to a multiple choice exam. Students enrolled in AP® courses are required to take the AP® exam. Students are responsible for the exam fee which is determined by the College Board.

GenerationTECH (Student Technology Support Team) 9th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Students taking the GenerationTECH course will be in the program as both a student and a troubleshooter. Students will learn the technical and communication skills necessary to troubleshoot, fix, and maintain the technology used at Northland. At the same time, students will be part of the Northland technology support team to help students and teachers keep their computers running properly. All students will be exposed to troubleshooting, time management, peer mentoring, resource development, problem solving and will have the opportunity to develop competency with numerous computer programs and procedures.

GenTech Internship 10th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Generation Tech, instructor approval
The student in the GenerationTECH Internship course will work one-on-one with the Staff Tech Team as both a student and a troubleshooter. The student will learn the technical and communication skills necessary to troubleshoot, fix, and maintain the technology used at Northland. At the same time, the student will be part of the Northland technology support team, helping students and teachers keep their computers running properly. The student will be exposed to troubleshooting, time management, peer mentoring, resource development, problem solving and will have the opportunity to develop competency with numerous computer programs and procedures. This is a great opportunity for individual students to develop their technical skills.

Robotics & Engineering Design I & II 9th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required.
Robotics and Engineering Design is a course designed for students interested in pursuing a career in engineering with special emphasis on robotics. Students will develop an understanding of how modern engineers use math and science, together with ingenuity, to design and build new technologies, be exposed to new and relevant applications of mathematics and science to solve engineering problems of the day, develop a deeper and broader set of computer skills, and be exposed to a variety of new and future career opportunities in engineering and technology. During the first semester students will design, program, and build a robot for competition in the First Tech Robotics competition. The second semester will focus on a series of engineering design projects intended to provide exposure to larger engineering disciplines. Students will be expected to attend competitions (generally held on Saturdays) and be responsible for an activity fee of $50.

Robotics & Engineering Design III & IV Honors  11th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required.
Robotics and Engineering Design is a course designed for students interested in pursuing a career in engineering with special emphasis on robotics. Students will develop an understanding of how modern engineers use math and science, together with ingenuity, to design and build new technologies, be exposed to new and relevant applications of mathematics and science to solve engineering problems of the day, develop a deeper and broader set of computer skills, and be exposed to a variety of new and future career opportunities in engineering and technology. During the first semester student will design, program, and build a robot for competition in the First Tech Robotics competition. The second semester will focus on a series of engineering design projects intended to provide exposure to larger engineering disciplines. Students will be expected to attend competitions (generally held on Saturdays) and be responsible for an activity fee of $50.

Athletic Training I, II, III, IV
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required. 
This class is designed to introduce athletic training fundamentals to high school students in an environment built on teamwork and responsibility. The students will learn all forms of taping and wrapping, basic first aid techniques, will be certified in CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) and the use of an AED (Automatic External Defibrillator). They will receive instructions in OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) standards for “blood-born pathogens” as well as medical terminology and anatomy. On the field/court, students will assist in practice and game preparation. In the training room, students will utilize their skills in taping and first aid, preparing first aid kits, and assisting in different forms of rehabilitation as well as stocking supplies.

Intro to Debate & Public Speaking 9th - 12th Grade
2 Semesters
This course is intended for students that wish to learn critical thinking skills through debate but do not have the availability or interest in competing at debate tournaments. Students will learn different formats of debates and speeches throughout the semester that will help foster critical thinking and argumentative skills which are crucial to success in college and beyond. Through public speaking practice in the classroom, students will develop the communication skills that they will utilize in academic, social, and workplace settings. Optional tournament participation may be offered to students throughout the semester.

Debate - Competitive & Public Speaking I, II 9th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required.                             
As a student in this class, you become a member of the nationally recognized Northland Christian School Debate Team. This class is intended to provide classroom focus for learning speech and debate skills for students that are in their first year of competitive debate. The course focuses exclusively on debate and public speaking events such as Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Public Forum Debate, Extemporaneous Speaking, World Schools Debate, Original Oratory, Impromptu Speaking and Congressional Debate. The course is designed to foster critical thinking and argumentative skills which are crucial to success in college and beyond. Through public speaking practice in the classroom and in competition, students will develop the communication skills that they will utilize in academic, social, and workplace settings. Students are required to attend five tournaments during the school year. Class size is limited.

Debate Competitive & Public Speaking Honors III, IV 11th - 12th Grade
1 Credit ~ 2 Semesters
Prerequisite and Limitations: Debate I and II. Application required.
The honors level is for students who are participating in Debate for the third or fourth year in high school. Students are expected to serve as leaders and mentors to other students while advancing their own skills to a higher level.

Testing Strategies and Preparation 10th - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
This course will present strategies and skills for improving standardized test scores. Basic verbal and mathematical skills assessed on the SAT/ACT tests will be reviewed, as well as general test-taking strategies and ways to reduce test anxiety. Students will complete practice tests, multiple-choice assessments, and essay prompts. Additional material will include samples with explanations and study resources.

Academic Decathlon - Competitive & Public Speaking Honors I, II, III, IV
9th - 12th Grade
.5 Credit ~ 1 Semester
Prerequisite and Limitations: Application required.
The course enrollment is by invitation only. Students must participate in the ACADEC program to enroll in the course. If for some reason the student quits or is dismissed from the program, he/she exits the class.

All courses taught at Northland meet a high academic standard and prepare students for college. However, all students are gifted in different ways and it is important that they be placed in the classes that best meet their needs. For interested students who are ready for the challenge, advanced courses are offered in most subject areas. A parent/student signed contract will be required for all AP, Dual Credit, and online classes. Additional fees may apply.
 
Honors, Pre-AP®, Dual Credit or AP®
For placement in an honors, Pre-AP®, Dual Credit or AP® class, the selection committee will use the following criteria:
  • Standardized test scores (TerraNova, PSAT, TSI,SAT, or ACT)
  • Teacher recommendations
  • Grade in the previous class

The following guidelines will help you decide whether your child is ready for the challenge:
 
1. Did your child score in the 85th percentile or above on standardized tests in the subject area in which they wish to advance? 
  • Math – Math section
  • English – Reading and Verbal skills
  • Biology – Reading and Verbal skills
  • Chemistry/Physics – Math section
  • History – Reading and Verbal skills
2. If your child wishes to advance to a more difficult level, did he or she make a 90 or above in the previous course? 

3. If your high school child is currently taking an advanced class, did he or she maintain a grade of at least an 85? If your middle school child is currently taking an advanced class, did he or she maintain a grade of at least an 85? Middle school students who do not maintain an 85 may be rescheduled during the first semester or may be required to repeat the course the following year. Due to the importance of the foundation required to advance successfully in math and foreign language, 8th graders taking Algebra I and Spanish I must make an 85 to advance.

4. Has your child demonstrated that he or she possesses the discipline and work ethic necessary to succeed in an advanced class?

Dual Credit Classes
Dual Credit classes allow students to earn concurrent high school and college credit. Therefore, placement in these courses is based on the entrance requirements for Lone Star College and Abilene Christian University. Students must apply to Lone Star College before testing so that scores may be attached to the application. The application and testing procedures can be obtained from the Academic Counseling Center in Building Seven. Student scores must meet Lone Star College standards on the TSI Assessment test unless exempt based on their SAT or ACT score. Abilene Christian University does not require an application, but students must meet the standards for the courses based on their SAT or ACT score. Test scores must be approved and on file in the Counselor’s Office prior to May 25th of the application school year or the student will not be enrolled in the course when the school year begins in August. Additional fees are required by Lone Star College and Abilene Christian University and are the responsibility of the student and parents. 

Online Classes
Students requesting to take an online class must be approved by the selection committee. Students requesting to take honors or AP® level classes online must meet the same criteria as face-to-face classes. Students wishing to take online classes for enrichment or classes necessary for completion of required high school course work, must demonstrate a willingness to learn and the self-discipline to work independently. Teacher recommendations and the online skills survey will be used by the selection committee to determine a student’s readiness for online classes. An online class contract is required for each course. 
Online classes may require an additional fee. Please contact the Counselor’s office for more information on online course options.
Northland is a member of the VHS Collaborative which allows our students access to a multitude of classes with no additional fee assessed. If your child needs to fit an extra class into an already full schedule, needs a class which is not available at our school, or simply enjoys using technology and wants the challenge and flexibility of a high-quality online class, Virtual High School can help.
 
Virtual High School students have the opportunity to select from the online catalog of semester-length and full-year courses.
 
How will my child benefit from VHS?
Through VHS, your child will:
  • Take one or more middle school or high school classes online.
    Enjoy small class sizes and low student to teacher ratios.
    Engage in unique collaboration opportunities with peers from around the world.
  • Take advantage of the flexibility of VHS courses that can take place anywhere, anytime.
  • Participate in courses that are highly desired, yet are not typically offered locally.

How can my child participate?
  • View the catalog of course offerings at www.vhslearning.org.
  • Complete and return the Registration Form and the VHS Student Contract to Building 3 Counseling Center for processing.
  • Upon approval by the selection committee, a class period will be assigned as part of the student’s schedule.